Project Search Results

Your search for "California State University, Humboldt" returned 10 results.

Evaluation of an alternative forest restoration treatment in Redwood National Park

1) Evaluate overall economic feasibility of utilization of woody materials generated from thinning treatments in Redwood National Park; 2) Quantify and compare economics between current method (chainsaw felling- cutting/ leaving whole trees of biomass on the ground) and the alternative method (chainsaw felling- Yoader pulling boles to roadsides leaving only limbs and tops on site); 3) Identify and evaluate important stand and treatment variables that determine overall economics of thinning treatments; 4) Develop prediction models that can be used to estimate thinning treatment costs in other places using the stand and treatment variables; and 5) Evaluate the amount of damage to residual trees from thinning operations and develop strategies to minimize impacts on residual stands

Project Number: 10-09-002
Funding Round: 11 (2009-2010)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Han, Han-Sup

Porcupine surveys for timber management

Objectives We propose to conduct intensive and extensive methods to survey for porcupines and describe their current distribution in southern Oregon and northern California. Our objectives are to: 1. develop best practices for inexpensive, noninvasive detection of porcupines on a landscape-scale, 2. conduct surveys in collaboration with external partners throughout the region, 3. analyze these data in order to provide preliminary estimates of current porcupine distribution, and 4. develop methods to analyze porcupine scat to describe differences in preferred food species.

Project Number: 15-06-002
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Bean, Tim

Biomass Dryer System

Statement of Project Objectives: The work proposed under this project is to test a small biomass dryer utilizing process heat from biomass conversion technologies to reduce the moisture content of feedstocks generated during the forest waste recovery process. Specifically, this project will support procurement, testing, and analysis of a small biomass dryer to supplement a larger research effort being led at Humboldt State University under the Waste to Wisdom project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Students and engineering staff at the Schatz Energy Research Center will carry out this project under direction from Dr. Arne Jacobson

Project Number: 16-06-001
Funding Round: 17 (2015-2016)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Jacobson, Arne

Managing Forest Residues

In seeking an alternative to current forest residue disposal procedures we are proposing to study the potential of an air curtain burner as an environmental friendly and cost effective residue disposal option for forest managers. The specific objectives for the research are to I) Document and compare the emission rates from the air curtain burner and conventional open pile burning forest residue disposal methods, 2) Determine the cost, productivity and logistics of the air curtain burner system and open pile burning in industrial timberland and National forest, 3) Evaluate various scenarios incorporating air curtain burner with Mobile Biomass Conversion Technology's (MBCT), as a new slash (non-utilizable component of forest residue) disposal method and power producing unit, 4) Characterize the current magnitude and distribution of forest residues on public and private lands in Humboldt county 5) Quantify and compare the amount of forest residues generated from different silvicultural prescriptions and 6) Develop recommendations on how to site and how often to move the air curtain burners and MBCTs to minimize the costs of transporting materials. We will test the following hypotheses: 1) The cost and productivity of operating air curtain burner in-woods is anticipated to be more efficient compared to the conventional method of piling and burning forest residues. The advantage and limitation of both scenarios will be compared in National Forests and industrial timberlands. 2) The power output from the air curtain burner and power generating unit could be used for supplementing MBCT's power requirements. By producing the necessary power for MBCT's the air curtain burner and power generating unit can facilitate a closed system completely fueled from forest residues. 3) The optimal location or a combined air curtain burner/MBCT and optimal frequency with which the system should be moved will depend on the current distribution of the backlog of forest residues and the silvicultural treatments used in the future. 4) Even-aged management results in less average annual residue production than uneven-aged selection management perform d in compliance with California Forest Practice Rules. Prolonging even-aged rotations by commercial thinning increases average annual residue production. Managing forests at higher stockings to enhance carbon sequestration also results in greater average annual residue production.

Project Number: 15-06-001
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Han, Han-Sup

Climate change adaptation

The research team shall perform all scientific and technical services necessary to accomplish the work, including all labor, materials, equipment, analysis, and facilities. General questions answered by this work will include: • What is the regeneration rate of conifer species and aspen in the under story and does the rate differ by treatment type (e.g., thinning and/or thinning and pile burning, etc.)? • What is the proportional representation of conifer species and aspen growing in the under story and does this differ by treatment type (e.g., thinning and/or thinning and pile burning, etc.)? • What can regeneration rate and representation of conifers and aspen in the under story tell us about the longevity of our treatments in maintaining aspen persistence in the over story? To answer these questions, the research team will collect and compare data for aspen and conifer species re-concentrating in and near, and away from burn scars within a treated stand and in unburned stands. Regeneration will be described by growth rate and either proportion, percent cover, or some other proxy to indicate how aspen are represented in the under story compared to various conifer species. These data would be expressed as an average by site. grand average for all sites, and an average within and outside a pile bum scar. Differences in these data would be detected through statistical analyses (e.g., ANOVA). Data for other potentially influential variables (e.g., canopy cover) will be collected at the discretion and decision of the researcher. The research team will prepare and submit a comprehensive report summarizing the study results to LTBMU. At a minimum, the report will include a description of the data collected. methods used, analytical techniques, results, summary, and management recommendations. The results, summary, and management recommendations should be easily understandable by the public and should provide a clear big picture of what the results mean for aspen restoration. If the research team develops a regression equation for use for predicting growth rate of seedling up to sapling size that will be included in the report along with instructions of how to use and interpret this equation and any caveats.

Project Number: 15-06-003
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Berrill, John-Pascal

Social Science Lands Mgmt

Objectives In light of the research goal,the proposed project has six key objectives: 1) Assess the meaning of ALM to different forest landowners, and their interests and experiences in this approach and in cross-boundary forest management efforts. 2) Describe the forest management goals and practices of diverse landowners and how they contribute to or constrain ALM; and the potential costs, benefits, and trade-offs for landowners of participating in ALM projects. 3) Characterize the legal,regulatory, and economic environment around forest management by ownership category and location, and how this influences participation in ALM projects. 4) Identify policy tools, landowner assistance programs, and other incentive mechanisms for . building landowner capacity to engage in successful ALM forest restoration efforts. 5) Evaluate the effectiveness of existing governance institutions for collaborative forest restoration for achieving ALM, how they could be improved, and alternative institutional arrangements that might be more effective for accomplishing this goal. 6) Test how well theories of collective action apply in the context of managing environmental processes (like fire), and contribute to theories of collective action by gaining insight from the study of ALM projects. The forest landowners and managers of focus in this study will vary by case study location but will include a mix of participants representing federal,state, tribal,corporate, and non-corporate forest land ownerships across a sample of case study locations.

Project Number: 15-06-004
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Kelly, Erin

CA winegrapes

Objectives This project aims to examine the use of nest boxes to attract barn owls to California's wine-grape vineyards as a means to control rodent pest populations. In addition, the project will include "proof-of-concept" work examining the capacity for songbirds to help control insect pests, which is vital to demonstrate feasibility of procedures for future grant proposals. Ongoing research has confirmed that barn owls colonize nest boxes erected in vineyards (Alder 2013, Browning 2012, 2013, Sawyer 2009, Tillmrum 2012, Wendt and Jolmson, in prep). However, the removal of rodents from vineyards by owls remains unquru1tified , and farmers lack information on how to erect boxes to promote their use by owls. Recent field trials also suggest that inse ct-eating songbirds may be able to reduce abundance of insect pests (Heaton et al. 2008 , Jedli ka et al. 2011, 201.4, Howard and Johnson 2014). However, this preliminary work has relied on experiments with convenient but unrealistic surrogates for pests (such as meal worms available from pet supply stores); future work needs to be more realistic, monitoring the removal of true insect pests in true field settings. To fill these knowledge gaps, this project has the following specific objectives: 1. Provide vineyard managers with recommendations to optimize the occupancy of nest boxes by barn owls. 2. Quantify the number and rate of rodent pest ingestion by owls. 3. Quantify the extent to which owls hunt within vineyards versus surrounding agricultural lands. 4. Calculate the cost of removing rodents with owls versus alternative methods. 5. Establish protocols to rear and deploy omnivorous leafroller (Platynola slulana) and/or orange ortrix (Argyrotaenia citrana) in the field, and conduct "proof-of­ concept" field trials to demonstrate that larger field experiments with these caterpillar pests are feasible.

Project Number: 15-06-005
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Johnson, Matthew D.

Evolution of Masting

Objectives: I will show that within a species such as Pinus contorta that has populations lacking serotiny, the serotinous populations will have lower CV than non-serotinous genotypes (P. contorta var latifolia vs P. contorta var contorta). Further, I will test models of masting based solely on cues using the continent-wide white/Engelmann spruce data set as well as the elevational transects for Engelmann spruce in Colorado and Alberta. This work will focus on weather intervals consonant with what is known about the period of differentiation and resource accumulation, and will also be phenologically realistic across latitudes and elevations.

Project Number: 15-06-006
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Biodiversity
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Greene, David

Assessing Red Fir Mortality

Objectives: Our objectives can be split into three-related parts. 1. We will document the extent of the red fir mortality even. During summer 2015, we will collect data in at least 70-100 plots on red fir health and causal agents of mortality. 2. We will use historical aerial imagery to assess past red fir mortality events both in terms of size and frequency. This will produce a context in which to evaluate the current outbreak. 3. We will use new aerial survey data from summer 2015 (provided by U.S. Forest Service) to quantify the extent of forest loss due to the current mortality event. This data will be ground-truthed using our field data (#1, above).

Project Number: 15-06-007
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Jules, Erik

Sugar Pine Resilience

Objectives: The main objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of prescribed burning and raking treatments on increasing resilience and survival of large sugar pines. More specifically, we aim to answer the following questions: Question 1: What is the longer-term response of sugar pine growth to prescribed fire and raking treatments? H1: Raking and prescribed fire will result in a greater growth response compared to control treatments. Question 2: What is the longer-term response of sugar pine defense to prescribed fire and raking treatments? H2: Raking and prescribed fire will result in greater allocation to defense (i.e. resin ducts) compared to control treatments. Question 3: What is the effect of raking and prescribed fire treatments on the probability of sugar pine mortality? H3: Prescribed fire and raking treatments that increase sugar pine growth and defense will reduce the probability of mortality.

Project Number: 15-06-008
Funding Round: 16 (2014-2015)
Research Focus Area: Natural Resources
ARI Member Campus: California State University, Humboldt
Director: Kane, Jeff
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